Spec Tracking, Week of April 12th, 2010

Sorry, folks, that it’s been such a long time since I posted loglines of scripts that are circulating in Hollywood right now. This so far has been the most popular feature on this blog, so I’ll try to remember to post them frequently. At some point in the near future I’ll be doing a week-long blitz with several dozen loglines for your reading enjoyment, so keep an eye out for that.

This week, we have a CIA action thriller (always a perpetual favorite; if there’s one thing people love to write about more than hit men, it’s spies), a supernatural horror period piece, and a rom com with a mediocre premise. People, if you’re going to write a romantic comedy, either your premise or your writing had better be pure gold. Oh, and for good measure, I’ve added a logline for the latest addition to the oversaturated “dance competition” sub-genre.

MORE IS NEVER ENOUGH
By Brandon M.
Logline: A formerly brilliant CIA agent, now a washed-up has-been, reconnects with his long-lost true love and estranged teenage son on a cross-country mission to save the world from imminent disaster.

EMPIRE OF THE WOLF
by John P.
Logline: Upon inheriting the empire, a Roman prince turns to his former bodyguard to escort him safely back to Rome, but on the journey they must survive six rogue Praetorians cursed with demonic powers and hell bent on killing the prince before he’s crowned `Caesar’.
The story is loosely based on a young Roman prince who inherited the throne after his father’s death.

GUITARS WICKED AWESOME DANCE CREW
by Philip S. and Chad D.
Logline: When Lance Guitars, a depressed and fame-starved choreographer, finds himself hounded by goons over a gambling debt, he assembles a rag tag crew to compete for the prize money in the national dance competition.

THE SUGAR DADDY
by Flint W.
Logline: A romantic comedy about a mild-mannered suburban dad who, in an attempt to lure back his ex-wife, decides to become the sugar daddy to an independent-minded but down-on-her-luck younger woman.

If you have to mention in your romantic comedy’s logline that it’s a romantic comedy, it’s probably not a good sign — the movie’s description should give the genre away without needing to explicitly specify what that genre is. Of all four, the one with demonic Praetorians is the only one that sounded even mildly interesting, but I predict it’s the first script that will sell the fastest. What say you?

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2 Comments on “Spec Tracking, Week of April 12th, 2010”


  1. I totally disagree with you. For me, only one of these sounds remotely interesting. That said, it could also be that the loglines are badly written?

    • Amanda Says:

      Did you mean to say that you agree with me? Because I’m with you — only one of these sounds remotely interesting. The others I’ve seen endless variations on, especially anything written around a dance competition or anything to the tune of an ex-spy being called out of retirement for one last mission.

      That said, yeah, the logs themselves are often poorly written. And I don’t think there’s any excuse for that, regardless of whether the writer wrote it or his/her/their rep created an alternative one for them. But if the log itself is uninspired and uninteresting, that doesn’t bode well for the script itself, ya know?


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